Going to #EdcampSonoma

EdCamp Sonoma

A couple of months ago, I had the opportunity to participate in the EdCamp Sonoma event organized by Matt O’Donnell, 21st Teaching and Learning Specialist at the Sonoma County Office of Education (@21CMatt). One of the highlights of the day was learning about Google Hangouts and Google Hangouts on Air. During one of the sessions, the EdCamp Sonoma group participated in a live GHOA with the EdCamp Leander group. Continue reading

The Buffet Table #GAFESummit

Buffet table photo credit: shoot-first via photopin

One of the great things about the buffet table is that it offers so many tasty choices. We all have our own approach when wandering through the line. Some folks graze and nibble. Others fill their plates, sampling everything. If you’re like me, you go through the line once, then head back for seconds or even grab dessert.

Recently, I attended my first Google Apps for Education 1:1 Summit in Napa with a team of educators from my district. The event offered a cornucopia of delicious offerings for every palette. We came away with a lot of resources and tools to use in our classrooms. Shout outs to the edu-awesome EdTechTeam (@edtechteam), especially Mark Wagner (@markwagner) and Michael Wacker (@mwacker) as well as North Bay CUE Rockstar Extraordinaire, Sergio Villegas (@awesomecoachv) from Napa Learns for setting such an impressive table. Continue reading

Opening our Doors ….#NBCueMarin

open door

photo credit: Keoni Cabral via photopin cc

“Podcasting, tweeting, and blogging opens your doors!” — Adam Welcome, Principal, John Swett Elementary School

I spent a great day at the North Bay CUE Marin (@NorthBayCue) Conference. It has been energizing to connect and learn with truly amazing educators who are opening their doors and sharing their learning with others.

The day started with the Twitter Rocks Fiesta hosted by Amy Fadeji (@mrsfadeji), Principal at Penngrove Elementary School.  Why would educators want to use Twitter?  As Amy made clear, opening the doors to our schools through social media gives us an incredibly powerful way for us to tell our stories — of the learning happening in our schools — and to create our own networks for energizing ourselves by actively engaging with other educators.

At my next session — Trevor Mattea (@tsmattea), a third grade teacher from Mountain View, facilitated an inspiring session on using digital portfolios in elementary classrooms. I was truly impressed with the many ways that he has opened his classroom door and shared his students’ learning through photography, writing and developing digital citizenship. I plan to pass on the plentiful resources he shared to my colleagues and staff.

At the final stop on my #NBCueMarin tour, Adam Welcome (@awelcome), Principal at John Swett Elementary School, facilitated an edu-awesome session on blogging in our schools and classrooms and so much more. He started with jamming beats care of incrediblebox.com, then spun a versatile playlist of digital tools for connecting, learning and communicating with our staff, parents and community.  From Audioboo for podcasting, to tweeting events from the school day, and blogging to share with the big, wide world — I came away with new ways of thinking about connecting and learning.

Each of these educators is setting a powerful example of what it means to be connected. By opening our doors, we also open ourselves to endless possibilities, not only for our own growth and learning, but to being the change we wish to see in the world — to make a real difference for the children we serve.

What are some ways you open your doors?

A time for change…

small__8222922317photo credit: marsmet546 via photopin cc

I recently came across Tom Whitby’s insightful blog post, “Educator Fear and Discomfort.” His post provided me with some important perspective on how we approach integrating technology and learning.

Whitby highlights two counterproductive beliefs that stand in the way of fully integrating digital tools into the classroom: 1) that all kids are digital natives who know everything about technology and 2) that teachers cannot make mistakes in front of students. These beliefs coupled by a misguided notion that before a teachers can use technology with students they must know everything about the technology and all applications. Whitby correctly points out that this is simply impossible given the incredible pace of change.

The constant in education should be the learning and not the status quo. If society is moving to change at a rapid pace, then we need to develop in our children the skills and abilities to change as well, and that requires the same abilities in the educators who are charged with teaching our children.

Integrating digital tools into the learning process shifts “the learning dynamic for teachers and for students.” As he notes,”It requires a commitment to life long learning which goes beyond just the words.” In short, we must practice what preach.

He concludes by emphasizing that: “…we can better educate our students if we better educate their educators. We should never hold up our past as our children’s model for their future.”

Whitby’s post serves as an excellent reminder to educators who are focused on preparing children for their future, not our past.  Our work toward this goal needs to be focused on the learning first, not the devices. And, more importantly, bringing new digital tools into the classroom must be guided by a commitment to creating the conditions that make it possible through training, support, collaboration and encouragement for educators.

What are some ways that we can create the conditions that make this kind of transformation in teaching and learning a reality for students and educators?